Four weeks in

Copyright: tigatelu / 123RF Stock Photo

Today is four weeks since switch on.  Here’s where things are.

My ability to understand speech has dramatically improved.  I still ask people to repeat things and I am still lip reading (I doubt I will ever stop) but the feverish concentration whenever I’m trying to follow speech has gone.  It is as if the most extraordinary weight has lifted off my shoulders.  I can just TALK to people, with so much less effort. Continue reading


At the hospital

A best wishes message from a friend, on the occasion of my new ear

Do you want to hear about the operation?  (A number of people have asked).  Or rather, what happened in the hospital (I was asleep for the operation).  The very squeamish needn’t read on.  No, really, it was fine.

First of all, a big cheer for the Listening for Life Centre at Bradford Royal Infirmary (BRI), the base of the Yorkshire Auditory Implant Service. Continue reading

Can you hear me yet?

Copyright: fourleaflover / 123RF Stock Photo

In late October Nigel and I were on holiday in Ethiopia.  It was a group holiday, which isn’t a great idea when you are really struggling with your hearing, but it had been booked and paid for prior to the hearing decline of 2017 described in earlier posts.  Overall, we had a fantastic time, but mealtimes were a nightmare.  I could talk to one person at a time in a quiet location, but when other people joined the conversation I was lost.  Put me round a table with a dozen people chatting to each other and it was utterly hopeless.

One lunchtime, it all became too much. Continue reading

In which I stir a mug of tea

I had completely underestimated how exciting it would be to hear things that are NOT speech.  As my hearing gradually got worse over the years many environmental sounds disappeared, but losing them didn’t make me feel particularly sad.  There were work-arounds for the loss of some sounds; others I just forgot about.

So for example, when I couldn’t hear the office fire alarm anymore I made sure I didn’t work there on my own.  When I was working away from home I’d tell the hotel to alert me if their alarm went off in the night. Continue reading

Switch on day

Neither of us slept much the night before. I was busy imagining every possible catastrophe.  Nigel had a strange dream in which he got so confused he had to be admitted to the village care home.  His friend Greg came to visit him, but Nigel thought Greg was Gandhi.  Because Gandhi is dead Nigel became convinced that HE was dead…… know how nightmares go….

It was a relief for both of us when it was 6.30 and we could get up and get on with the day; off to Bradford for switch on. Continue reading


The Limping Chicken (the world’s most popular deaf blog) published another of my bits of writing yesterday.  Thought you might like to see it (link below).  If you are a non-British reader mystified by the content, Google “things Brits say sorry for” and you will find several elucidating and hilarious lists.  Or, for a great piece by a British apologiser living in France, read Emily’s post on the subject, on her blog Lost in Lyon.

(Some of you know that yesterday was also the great cochlear implant switch-on day.  I’m doing fine, with everything squeaking away as expected.  Blog post in the offing…..)

And here’s the link to the Chicken.  See you soon.